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3

Food

 Grown Sustainably

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We cultivate nutritious food onsite, reducing its ecological footprint and promoting a healthy lifestyle.

Industrial agriculture contaminates water, degrades soil, and devastates local ecosystems. It’s also highly water-intensive, accounting for 70% of freshwater use in the world.

Successful climate adaptation requires the transformation of the global food system into something more localized, efficient, and ecologically aware.

Our community farm reintroduces food production as a visible and natural part of everyday life for residents—inviting them to further their connection with food and nature.

Through the use of regenerative farming practices, the environment also benefits, with higher yields, improved soil heath, increased biodiversity, and greater carbon-sequestration by the soil.

When the distance between consumer and producer decreases, transparency in the food system increases, which in turn drives changes.
– Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project

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Regenerative Agriculture

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Hyper
Local

In terms of freshness and quality, nothing compares to food enjoyed the same day it was harvested. Our farmer grows, harvests, processes, and delivers food to residents all onsite.

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Ecological
Agriculture

This form of agriculture replaces industrial pesticides and herbicides with biodynamic, no-till, and regenerative farming, producing higher yields, healthier soils, and increased biodiversity.

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Efficient
Systems

Rather than oppose nature, natural farming works with it, reducing the need for human or mechanical inputs by leveraging natural processes to the farm’s advantage.

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Industrial Agriculture

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Carbon

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Monocrop

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Transport

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Waste

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GMO's

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Water Waste

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Local Permaculture

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Hand-picked

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Organic

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Hyper-Local

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Regenerative

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Biodiverse

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Nutrients

projects

Farmy: Zero

Coming Spring 2022

Creating the most sustainable and energy-efficient housing communities in the history of California.